Sundarban, largest mangrove forest

Sundarban


Sundarban is the largest mangrove forest in the world. This forest is situated in the Ganges and Brahmaputra estuarine and extends across West Bengal of India. In 1997, the UNESCO was recognized as World Heritage Site. The total area of the Sundarban is 10000 square kilometer (sq km). It's Bangladesh area is about 6,017 square kilometer.

The forest is known as the habitat of numerous species of animals, including the famous Royal Bengal Tiger, various types of birds, Chitraa deer, crocodiles, and snakes. Apart from this, great Sundari and Golpata trees are also found in this forest area. Huge honey is collected from honey bees every year from this forest.


Mangrove forest



The naming of Sundarban: The word "Sundarban" literally means "beautiful forest" or "beautiful woodland" in Bengali. The Sundarbans may have been named after the Sundari trees, which grow in abundance there. Other possible explanations may be that it has been named after "sea forest" (ancient indigenous). But it is assumed that Sundarbans have been called from the Sundari trees.


Largest mangrove forest


Geographic structure of Sundarban national park: The larger part of this mangrove forest (62%) of the two neighboring countries, Bangladesh and India, is located on the south-west side of Bangladesh. Bay of the South; The boundary between the Baleshwar River and the area of higher cultivation density in the north in the east. At the beginning of the eighteenth century, the size of the forest was near twice the present.

Mangrove forest map

Human pressure on the forest gradually shrunk its area. In Bangladesh, its total land area is 4,143 sq km. And the remaining water stream with river and canal is 1,874 square kilometers. Sundarban Rivers mix salt water and sweet water. It is located in Satkhira, Khulna, Bagerhat, Patuakhali region in Bangladesh.


What is a mangrove forest
Tangled roots
What is a mangrove forest/definition of mangrove forest: The mangrove forests are the saltwater forests.The unique feature of mangrove plants is that they grow in swampy areas and has tangled roots located above ground, which helps to remove oxygen from the atmosphere when it comes up on the ground. That's why a lot of mangrove plants are seen in the Sundarban in the southern part of Bangladesh and India. About 100 species of mangrove plants, including Sundari, Keora, Garna are found in our Sundarbans, of which at least 28 species are true mangrove.


Mangrove forest plants
Golpata (Nypa fruticans)

The diversity of plants: The main forest variations of the Sundarbans are abundant in Sundari, Gewa, Garna, and Kaira. According to a report published in 1903, there is a total of 245 class and 334 species of mangrove plants.

After this report, there have been significant changes in various mangrove species and their classification. Like the forest very rarely has been searched for the calculation of these changes. Grass and shrubs include Shawn, Nolkhagra (pipe reed), Golpata pavement, etc. Kheora refers to the newly formed sludge, and this species is important for wildlife, especially for Chitra deer.


Mangrove forest animals


Wildlife/animals in mangrove forest: There is a wide variety of wildlife in the Sundarbans. Hunting is prohibited in some areas. Although it is evident those animal resources in Bangladesh, have decreased in recent times and the mangrove forest is not beyond this. The Sundarbans has survived many species of progeny and other related species.

Mangrove forest animals


Among them, tigers and shushuks are being planned. Ecology of the Sundarbans is a fundamental nature and which is a vast place of wild animals. Turtles, lizards, oysters and the Royal Bengal Tiger are among the local species of the Sundarbans. 


Mangrove forest animals


Various species of deer, buffalo, rhinoceros, and crocodiles have become rare in the Sundarbans since the beginning of the 21st century.

Animals in mangrove forest

The Sunderbans of Bangladesh are commercially valuable 120 species of fish, 270 species of birds, 42 species of mammals, 35 reptiles and eight amphibian species habitats. 

Animals in mangrove forest


This indicates that there are a large number of species are available in the Bangladesh part of Sundarbans(such as 30 percent reptiles, 37 percent of birds and 37 percent mammals). In the case of bird watching, reading, and research, a paradise for the birds of the Sundarbans.


Mangrove forest animals



Royal Bengal Tiger/Sundarbans Tigers: The Royal Bengal Tiger named Sundarbans is a world-famous tiger. According to 2004 estimates, the Sundarbans is home to about 500 Royal Bengal Tigers, which is the single largest part of the cat. But the number of tigers is decreasing day by day. According to a 2011 report, the total number of tigers in the Sundarbans is almost 300. The Wildlife Conservation Committee took various steps to protect them.

Animals in mangrove forest


Also, these Sundarban tigers are also widely known for killing about 30 to 100 people every year. However, there was no news of any deaths due to the tiger attack in the Indian part of the Sundarbans due to various measures are taken for security. Local people and government officials take various safety measures to prevent the attack of tigers. Before the commencement of the journey by keeping local festivals like Banadevi or Banbibi and performing religious rituals.

It is also important to local people to pray for the God of the tiger for the safe wander in the Sundarban. Since the tiger always attacks from behind, fishers and woodcutters have a mask behind the head. Although the system worked for a short time, the Tigers then understood the tactic and started attacking again.


Sundarban Royal Bengal Tiger


Government officials wear hard pads like a pad of American football players, which cover the back part of the neck. This arrangement is made to prevent the biting of tigers in the spine, which is their preferred attack strategy.

Why do these Tigers attack people and some of their supposed reasons are:

As the Sundarban is located in the coastal areas, there is relatively salty water here. Tigers drinks fresh water among the other animals here. Some people think that due to the salinity of papaya Pani, tigers are uncomfortable at all times which make them immensely aggressive. It did not solve after making the artificial freshwater lake.

Another possibility is that due to the weather, they have become accustomed to human flesh. Thousands of people died due to the tidal surge in Bangladesh and India. And these molten dead bodies torn by the torrent ate tigers. Due to natural high-low flows and in wet areas, it is difficult for tigers to catch other animals.


Mangrove forest fishThere is no scientific research done on the overall fish of the Sundarbans. As a result, there is no data-based information on the present condition of this mangrove forest fish. Some species have been identified which are suitable for people. It is believed that there are about 300 species of fish in the Sundarbans. 

Fisheries resources are divided into two parts of the Sundarbans. All fish are white fish; the rest are Bagda, Golda (Pulp) and Kakra (Crab). Kalihangar, Ilsha Kamat, Thotti Kamat, Kanua Kamat are found in the Sundarbans.

Previously they could be found in Khalishpur area, now many have moved south. They have a high prevalence in the Sunderbans. These numbers are deficient; especially the black sharks are very rare now.
 


At one time the name of the java fish could have been heard, they were 55 centimeters long. Now loaded up. Delicious fish like Payratoli or Chitra are also less in number now. The most familiar fish in Sundarbans is Parshe fish. The fish can be found in large quantities throughout the jungle, and they are up to 16 cm long in size.

Kharshulla or Khalla are delicious fish, but many of them are not seen anymore in the rivers or canals. Kanmagur is the deadly fish, and it has deadly poison. Though some of the Kanmagur fishes are still found, Dagi Kan Magur is now extinct. There are also many types of fish; most of these fishes are almost in extinct condition.

In the Sundarbans, a fisherman uses 13 types of fishing techniques. However, poisoning is the biggest harm to fish. Most of the locals here are living in fish.



Sundari tree
Sundari tree
Economy: The Sunderbans population is more than 4 million. But most of it is not permanent population. In the southwestern economy of Bangladesh, as well as in the national economy, the Sundarbans also play a significant role. It is the single largest source of forest resources of the country. These forests provide raw materials in wood-based industries.

Local people regularly collect Gol leaves, honey, fish, crabs, and snails-mussels from the woods. The land of the Sundarban is the vital habitats, nutrition producers, water purifiers, silt collectors, storm prevention, coastal shelters, power reserves and tourism centers.

These forests play a very resistant and productive role. Sundarban is the fifty-one percent of total reserve forest in Bangladesh.41% of total income comes from it and it has 45 percent of the contribution of timber and fuel production (World Food Agency, 1995).

Many industries (such as Newsprint, Firebox, Hardboard, Boat, and Furniture) are dependent on raw materials derived from this mangrove forest. Various non-wood resources and forestry created significant opportunities for employment and income opportunities for at least three lakh coastal populations. Alongside the productive role, the Sundarban also play a part in the cyclone-prone Bangladesh's coastal people and the inherent security of their property.


Mangrove forest


It is noteworthy that the role of Sundarbans in the fields of beauty, forestry, employment, animal and plant diversification, fisheries, providing raw materials for different industries, maintaining natural balance, protecting from adverse weather conditions, etc. For the development of our country, we should give more attention to the protection of the forest resources and the wildlife of the Sundarbans.

Thousands of people come from outside the country watching the Sundarbans every year, and we are not able to preserve our precious wealth properly. Especially our nation's government should strengthen and harness forest protection and wildlife protection laws.


Sundarban Animals


Those who visit the Sundarbans should also be careful that we do not harm our forest resources and wildlife by making fun or deletion; we can also warn others about this because many animals and birds die for this reason every year.
 
Attractive places to visit: Kotka and Kanchikhali Sanctuary center, located at the Tiger Point of Sharonkhola Range in the eastern part of the Sundarbans, the Karmzal wildlife and crocodile breeding centers near the port of Mongla, the Herbalia Ecotermis center, the Nilkamal sanctuary of Hiranpoints in the western division, the Mandarbariya sanctuary, crocodile breeding, sick deer care, thousands of years of old debris, and some of the beautiful scenes of nature can be enjoyed.

You can also see the monkeys, deer, crabs or crocodile trekking scenes to walk in the forest by walking a wooden walkway made from one to five kilometer in these spots. If there is fate in Tiger Point, Hiranpoint or Burigolini, Harbari, then the Royal Bengal Tiger can be seen. Few observation towers are available in these places.

Dublar Char, Sundarban
Dublar Char
Dublar Char: Many tourists visited the monsoon settlement of Fisherman Dublar Char, outside of the planned tour of the forest department. In winter, there is a scene of dried fish from the Bay of Bengal, and in the rainy season, you can see catching Hilsha fish. Every year, on the island, Rashmella is sitting on the full moon of Kartik-Agrahayana.


Katka Sundarban
Kotka
Kotka: This is one of the beautiful areas of the Sundarban. It is the best place to watch deer. And wherever there is food, the tigers in the hope of eating. If you are lucky enough, can see tigers here. Kotka is150 km away from Khulna city and 100 kilometers south of Mongla.


Jamtala
One of Katka's attractions is the Chitra deer, the Watch Tower of Jamtala, the secluded seashore of the Jamtala and the tremendous excitement of the journey there. There is another kind of fun to ride the boat in the canal, but in that case, the boat will be replaced by the engine boat. Because the wild animals run away in the words of the engine. If you are very fortunate, you can meet the Mete Meso Owl and black face para birds.

Kochikhali: Kochikhali is the best destination for those who are attracted by the sea. It can be carried out on the shore or boat in the direction of 14 kilometers east of Kotka. The main attraction here is pollution free sea. Along with the night, the fireworks, galaxies etc. And at the same time, the feeling of rotating in the boat is another. Deer, crocodiles, monkeys, and tigers are one of the attractions here.

Mandarbariya: Mandarbariya is an isolated island in the south-west corner of the Sundarbans. From Dublar Char or Nilkomol, it is very easy to get here by the waterways. Being an isolated island, solitude is one of the features here. Tortoises are laid eggs here at night. Irrabati dolphins, bottlenose dolphins, pistachios, king cobras, king crabs and other crabs.

Karamajal: Karamjal is one of the main ways to enter the Sundarbans. Only 45 minute's waterway from Mongla port. For those who do not have time, it is one of the good spots for them because at half an hour you will get an idea about the entire Sundarban.


Hiron Point Sundarban
Hiron Point
Nilkomol: This place in the southern part of the Sundarbans is also called Hiron Point. This spot is about 80 kilometers away from Mongla. The main attraction is the king cobra, dolphins, deer, and tigers.

Harberia: If you can get out from Mongla by Rupsha River in the very early morning, then you can visit the Harberia Forest Station in the daytime. The maximum cost will be six thousand Taka. Deer and monkeys will be seen in the team. Maya deer can be seen if you are lucky. And there are many species of birds. Apart from this, three new sanctuaries have been announced recently to protect Shushuk, Irabati Dolphin, Kalikaitta Turtle, Kalamukh Parapakhi and water fishing cat.

Visiting Cost: After the three days journey from the Sundarbans packages to the ship, the cost of the launches, fuel, food, snacks, government side of everyone, revenues, guides, a gunman, small boats roaming in the forest, and all other costs are included in the return. Here are the possible values mentioned in Khulna or Mongla. BDT 6000-8000 is enough for a single person in a medium type of tour in Sundarban.


Just like a mother keeps her child in deep trouble with all the storms and dangers, just like the Sundarbans also keep Bangladesh from lots of risks. Most of the essential oxygen for our survival comes from the forest of the Sundarbans. If Sundarbans mangrove forest survives, Bangladesh will survive, the biodiversity of this country, the people of this country will survive.

114 comments:

  1. Lovely made, a little but much to read for blog , but no worries you kept it interesting , love the photos

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    1. Many thanks Havorka. You will love to read and and visit the world's largest mangrove forest.

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    2. Yes I will love to visit it, how may tigers Adel icing there ? They are beautifu animals

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  2. Thank you so much for this wonderful article

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  3. awesome, but yes I do agree with Mr.Dieter's comments. Photos did made it interesting but anyways a great post.

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  4. These are great photos , lovely article

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  5. This is such a great post! Loved all of the information and history behind it all. Really loved this article. And ignore the first guys comment about it being too long. There are times an article has to be detailed and long, and you did an amazing job xx

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  6. Never have I seen a Royal Bengal tiger live in its majestic glory in front of my eyes even though the desire has been always there.

    From what I've heard, pictures can never do justice to the sheer beast that it is :)

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  7. This place looks absolutely magical and must be preserved for future generations!

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  8. Great read.
    Very informative and great photos.

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  9. Very good post! I can see that you have a lot of passion of what you are writing! You have put much work into this post...like other post I have read from you. I have visit India but never to the mangroove. They are kind of special...almost scary! I wouldnt dare to swim there though!

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  10. Loved the post. Indeed a beautiful place

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  11. Awesome read. Geography and photography are two of my favourite things in the world, so this was so lovely to read. AND SO INFORMATIVE!

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  12. This forest is now in my bucket list! It truly looks like a magical place, I'd love to visit it and see all the beautiful animals.

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  13. OH!!! a hidden paradise and let's hope that it will remain as it is now...Unesco to help on that! I have never been in these places, so your post is amazing! Thank you for travelling me :)

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  14. your posts are always so informative. love them! Let's hope all these beautiful animals remain protected.

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  15. Thank you for this as it was an interesting read for me. Had no idea about this forest and such as shame it has shrunk over time. Amazing animals in there.

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  16. wow what a beautiful place. I wish that people can always help to protect and preserve places like this. not only people can benefit but also the animals in that area

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  17. Great article, you obviously have a great love for the area and concern for the animals.

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  18. This is such a beautiful place! It's so sad to hear that it's shrinking.

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  19. Wow, what a truly amazing place. I learnt so much reading through your post. I can't believe that the Sundarban was twice the size. That must have been amazing. It always makes me so sad when us human encroach on nature and destroy something that's so precious. I would love to see the forests for myself one day

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  20. I didn't know for this one! It looks so beautiful and these pictures are really amazing. Ihope I will get a chance to visit it one day.

    Can't wait for your next post!

    http://www.beautystuffbyana.com/

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  21. Great article! I loved all of the information and history behind it all.

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    1. It's really my pleasure that you liked the article, come visit to Sundarban, world's largest mangrove forest.

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  22. Very informative. Looks stunning. Would love to visit one day with my son. We have started travelling and the bucketlist keeps getting longer. Added to the bucketlist��

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  23. the wildlife there is absolutely stunning - i can't even imagine seeing that kind of wildlife in person

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  24. Wow this sure was really helpful.i will surely use some of the points in my geography presentation thats tomorroow

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  25. These photos are amazing! I love the one of the tiger! It is so chilling... thank you for sharing all this information :)

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  26. Love these photos! The country seems like a place I'd love to visit some day. Those beaches look so beautiful, in particular.

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  27. It truly lives up to its meaning, "beautiful forest" doesn't it! This looks like a wonderful and memorable trip, gorgeous photos!

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  28. Wow this place looks like a great adventure waiting to happen! Thank you for sharing your thoughts and experiences - this seems like quite an authentic trip and glad that you wrote about it. Will be bookmarking!

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  29. Wow the largest mangrove forest that is definitely an accomplishment and a beautiful forest too! Jamtala looks so perfectly serene too x

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  30. This was so interesting! I hadn't heard of this forest before but the photos are just stunning and so interesting!

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  31. I did not know that the largest mangrove forest is located in West Bengal India and Bangladesh. It is definitely huge! So many animal species to see but I would be scared going there because of the tigers.

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  32. enjoyed reading,I have a fascination for wildlife and sunderbans has been on my list for the Royal Bengal tiger. Shall make it soon:)

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  33. Sundarban Mangrove Forest looks so mesmerising with all those beautiful animals. Thanks for sharing this post with breathtaking photographs and information.

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  34. Wow! I wasn't familiar with Mangrove Forest but your post has me inspired to see it. Great photo journal of this beautiful place. I'm looking forward to more of your blog posts!

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  35. WOW! Florida's Mangroves have nothing on these! The diversity of life is fascinating. The pictures are gorgeous. And the history is incredible!

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  36. I always wanted to go to India & explore its beauty & culture. hopefully i'll have an opportunity to visit the biggest mngrove in the world

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  37. Beautiful place and your post is actually very detailed and informative! The fact that the police wears pads to prevent tigers from biting on the spine to me is extraordinary! Hope to see it someday!

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  38. Thanks for writing an informational post about Sundarban! I had no clue this mangrove forest existed until now! I really enjoy learning abut the wildlife there, especially! Keep it up!

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  39. I'm Asian and know much about places here. But i heard first time th name of this forest. Its one on the amazing places.

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  40. Wow! This is such an awesome post. Sundarban has always been on wishlist. I wish that Government take some necessary steps to preserve the beauty and nature.

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  41. Oh this looks s great place. I hope i can visit here someday. Looks a wonderful forest with those wildlife animals.

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  42. I wasn't familiar with Subdurban before this blog, but it sounds fasicinating! It sounds like a lot of wildlife thrive there, but it's sad that some of them, like the tigers, are struggling to survive. Your blog is very informative!

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  43. Sunder means beautiful in 'hindi' . And sunderban definitely lives upto it's name. It's high on my bucket list

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    1. Sundar means beautiful in Bengali as well.

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  44. WOW, this place looks great. It would be a great adventure and something completely out of my comfort zone!

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  45. Wow this place certainly looks mesmerising.. I'm a huge wildlife can

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  46. this article shows that sundabarn is rich in natural beauties and beautiful creatures. this place should be preserve or taking care by the people around this place.

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  47. You take wonderfulwildlife photos! I really like the one of the tiger. I'd never heard of this forest before but now I need to add it to my list of reasons to visit Bangladesh.

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  48. I had no idea such a gorgeous place existed! I love all the wildlife there!

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  49. Awesome read! I had never heard of this beautiful area before and I enjoyed learning so much about it! Your photographs are so beautiful! Thanks for sharing! Shell

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  50. I'd not heard of Sundarban before and didn't know much about mangroves before either. It sounds such an amazing place to see so many different types of wildlife. I would love to see the tigers! It's just a shame the numbers are decreasing.

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  51. These pictures look absolutely breathtaking, it looks so lush! I also love all of the wildlife, definitely a dream place to visit one day!

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  52. Such a great example of how nature is helping us survive! I wish we could appreciate it more... Your pictures are so beautiful!

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  53. Well looky here, I never knew Sundarban is the largest mangrove forest in the world... great article, lovely pics... enjoyable read

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  54. wow, this place looks wonderful!! I'm a huge fan of wildlife!! these photos are amazing!! Hope I will be able to visit it soon! Loved this post, thanks for sharing!!

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  55. Wow! This was good information about the Sundarban Mangroves and the whole area. Thank you for sharing and for showing us with those magnificent pictures.

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  56. Great article and thanks for increasing my knowledge about sunderbuns. Now this is also my must visit list in India which I have to complete before 30.

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  57. These images really attract me. I wish I could be there

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  58. This looks like such a beautiful and intriguing place to visit! Absolutely beautiful!

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  59. I remember learning about the Sunderbans in school a long time ago. It was fascinating then and your article and pics have made it fascinating even now.
    Thank u.

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  60. I love to experience the thrill of an adventure and would love dipping into the mangrove forests on a day trip. Perhaps it requires a 3-day boat trip if you really need to delve deep into the swamps. That would be so much fun.
    From: Calleigh Keibler

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  61. Mangrove Forest I read about it in my school days. After reading your postit reminded me of my school das. Its so beautiful to see such a lovely gift from Mother Nature.

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  62. Wow the place looks very well preserved and beautiful. All the animals, I would love to meet them!

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  63. lovely post. I have learnt so much about Sundarbans

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  64. nice post.. thanks for share

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  65. Great Sunderbans sitting on two sides, in your country Bangladesh and in my country India. Felt so happy knowing your side of beautiful Sunderbans.

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  66. Such an interesting post! Thanks for talking about the Bangladeshi Sunderbans!

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  67. This place looks so interesting to visit. You really convince me on your pictures. I am pretty sure that this would be a great adventure and completely out of my comfort zone.

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  68. Wow, amazing pictures, amazing view and amazing post. I would love to visit someday.

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  69. I've never even heard of the Sundarbarn before reading this! You've enlightened me and I love all the facts you've shared. India is way up there on my wish list of places to visit and Bangladesh is somewhere I've always wanted to go too... the tigers are a tad scary (if beautiful) though! Eek

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  70. Wow! Amazing! I love to travel but I will probably never get a chance to travel to Sundarban. I loved reading about this and the photos are beautiful.

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  71. Great post, very informative and wonderful pictures.

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  72. Great post, love sundarbans for their immense beauty. Lovely photos here

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  73. These photos were stunning! I enjoyed reading all the history and back ground you put into this piece. I've never visited Bangladesh, but this is beautiful.

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  74. Great post and quite informative. Plus you have some lovely pictures.
    Lea, xx

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  75. Bangladesh seems so incredible. I've never had any interest in visiting there until reading your blog. It seems so otherworldly.

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  76. Singapore used to be a place with loads of mangrove plantation... but they have mostly gave way to buildings now... It's so difficult to experience a primary one now... treasure yours!

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  77. I havent been here but I have heard a lot about this place. It looks beautiful!

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  78. This is a very detailed lesson about Mangroves. I enjoyed the photos. A beautiful reminder of how lovely Mother nature can be.

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  79. Mangrove forests are more and more rare these days, so it is good to see that something this amazing is still out there.

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  80. What a detailed post! I found it interesting to read about an area of the world I hadn't previously heard of

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  81. Awesome pictures - I've visited the Sundarbans , the parts in India :) . Truly stunning

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  82. Wow these pictures are breathtaking and all the info so awesome to learn. Thanks so much for sharing.

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  83. that looks amazing! all the nature and animals :o great detail about each part of the area too

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  84. Quite a beautiful article! Never knew so much was in a mangrove forest. Beautiful pictures too.

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  85. That is so beautiful. Its a wonder that nature can actual do that.

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  86. This looks like an amazing place and the photographs are just amazing!

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  87. im a big fan of the wild life and this sure is something to see! www.crayonized.com

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  88. i haven't heard for this place before!! i would love to visit it :-)

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  89. Gorgeous photos! This island mangrove reminds me of the fictional island mangrove featured in the movie Life of Pi.

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  90. Wow these are amazing photos I looooove the one of the Tiger!

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  91. I've always found mangrove forest as interesting and this has indeed re-affirmed that :) Such abundant wildlife!

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  92. Great insights! Mangroves are one of my favourite forest types and I hope humans can put in more efforts to conserve them.

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  93. The Sundarbans sound like an ecological beauty teeming with all sorts of life forms. As much as I like big cats, I don't want to be up close to one. Those tigers are very smart too.

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  94. Wow, this looks amazing. Thank you for sharing!

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  95. This post was so interesting to read! I love the photos!

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  96. I'd absolutely love to see a mangrove forest, but the way you've described those man-eating tigers, they sound quite terrifying!

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  97. these photos are so incredible! i didn't even know this place existed. thank you for opening my eyes!

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  98. Wow. This place is extremely beautiful, but to me at the same time, a bit intimidating lol. Would still be a pretty interesting place to visit though. Thank you for sharing it!

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  99. wow very beautiful nature plus wildlife. I love seeing green surroundings!

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  100. Wow, I've never heard of this place before! It's so beautiful! I just love seeing the pictures of the scene and the wild life! What an experience it would be go there! <3

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  101. Wow what an amazing post. I love to see animals in there natural state. I would love to visit the place and spend the whole day.

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  102. This is beautiful! Thank you for sharing these amazing beautiful wild life photos.

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  103. Wow what a truly amazing and beautiful place to visit!!! Putting this on my bucket list!!! Shell

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  104. Your wildlife photographs are stunning! Very interesting read!

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  105. How amazing to live in a place with so much diversity! It's absolutely beautiful. Thank you for sharing your little place in the world with us. Also, great niche. Love archeology. ��

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  106. Wow, I wouldn't have expected that much wildlife. Not sure if you took all of those photos, but they are amazing.

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  107. What a lovely article - I thoroughly enjoyed it as well as learning about all sorts of things i had no idea about. I would love to see a mangrove forest sometime (will include it on my bucket list) and also see some of the animals. Your pictures are lovely and really helped me to get a feel for the area. Thank You :-)

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  108. I love the pictures! Would love to see a magical bengal tiger someday :)

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  109. This place looks absolutely amazing. Are all these photos yours? They are fantastic!

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